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COW Blogs : Richard Harrington's Blog : DSLR VideoVideo
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Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video

ClickTrack.jpg








When you’re working on a music video and need to record a commercial or promo that’s tightly tied to a music track, it’s important to think ahead for post-production. Recording with a click track gives you the ability to sync multiple cameras and multiple takes across several locations. Using consistent, sequential audio cues, known as a click track, will help you sync your visuals in post.

On this week’s show, Robbie and Rich walk you through the benefits of using a click track when recording a musical performance.

This week we cover

• Using a click track: Learn how to use a click track in the field to synchronize multiple cameras.
• Creating a click track: Learn how you can create a click track before you shoot your footage.
• Playing a click track in the field: We’ll go over your options for playback with a click track while on set.
• Recording with a click track in the field: We’ll take you in the field to record a music video.
• Syncing in post–production: Learn how to sync your audio and visuals using a click track.

 

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best performance and make editing a breeze.




Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 2, 2013 at 1:44:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Fixing the Exposure Triangle Beyond Camera Settings

Throughout the past month, we’ve tackled the exposure triangle—the critical way to get properly exposed photos and videos. Remember your camera and lens have three essential controls that affect how much light comes into the camera: the aperture or opening of the lens, the shutter speed (how long the shutter opens), and the ISO (the sensitivity of your sensor).

But a problem as tough as exposure can still be hard to crack. What happens when you can’t get more light into the camera and the shot is dark? How about when you want shallow depth of field and the shot is overexposed? Sometimes you have to look past the camera and make external changes to get the results you want.

This week we cover

• Controlling exposure beyond camera settings:
How do you know when it’s time to stop pushing buttons on the camera and make a physical change to your shoot?

• Adding light:
Is your shot underexposed? When is it time to add more light—or reposition your subject?

• Adding filtration:
Too much light can also be a problem. Did you know that you can give your camera a “pair of sunglasses” when shooting in bright light?




Fixing the Exposure Triangle Beyond Camera Settings Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 29, 2013 at 2:48:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Understanding GoPro Bodies

GoPro cameras are great for time-lapse, underwater, and aerial photography. This tutorial takes a detailed look at GoPro cameras. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials....




Understanding GoPro Bodies Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 12, 2013 at 1:35:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Elevate Your Video Camera

A great way to create more interesting video perspectives is to raise your camera higher. Positioning the camera above any scene gives a unique view—and putting the camera into motion from that position can result in really dynamic shots.

In this week’s video, we look at a couple of tools for raising your camera up higher, and discuss techniques for getting the most out of elevated shots.

This week we cover

  • Using a monopod to extend your reach. Learn why a monopod is one of the easiest ways to get the camera up higher and extend it into a scene.
  • What is a jib? A jib is an extremely popular way of elevating the camera, while also putting it into motion. We’ll check out all the various features and parts of a jib system.
  • Operating a jib. Catch up with director of photography Jim Ball and learn about some hard-won techniques for operating a jib.
  • Real-world examples.  We’ll evaluate several elevated shots from a recent music video shoot, breaking down what worked and what didn’t.



Elevate Your Video Camera Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 11, 2013 at 3:04:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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How Do I Mount and Control a GoPro Camera?

Episode69_1-500x299.jpg








From its origins as a surf camera to its current incarnation as a flexible tool for any project that needs a small, durable, and capable camera, GoPro has become synonymous with go anywhere, “get the shot no matter what” productions.

Smaller than your fist and providing endless mounting options, GoPro cameras allow you to get shots you never thought were possible—especially where larger, more expensive cameras won’t work.

In this week’s episode, we’ll take a look at the iconic GoPro camera and how it can become even more flexible with different mounts, and the GoPro App, which allows you to remotely control your GoPro from mobile devices.

 

This week we cover

• Essential GoPro mounts: A huge advantage of a using a GoPro is how easy it is to mount it in different situations. We’ll show you some of our favorite ways to do it.

• Remote app: You can control your camera using the free GoPro App, available on iOS, Android, and Windows Phone. We’ll show you how to connect it to your GoPro, and both record and view shots. We’ll also show you how to change the settings on your GoPro camera directly from the app.

• Real-world examples: We’ll evaluate several shots from a recent shoot, including some using a GoPro on a quadcopter. We’ll break down what we liked and what we didn’t.

 

With its versatile mounts and a powerful remote app, GoPro cameras make a great addition to any filmmaker’s kit. Be sure to check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com.




How Do I Mount and Control a GoPro Camera? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 8, 2013 at 2:37:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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What is the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera?

Blackmagic Design is well known for its reasonably priced video post-production products, including interfaces and adapters. Recently they’ve also started making cameras, including the Blackmagic Cinema Camera, Production Camera 4k, and Pocket Cinema Camera—all with high-end features and great price points.

On this week’s episode, we’ll take a look at the small, yet capable Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera.

About the same size as a traditional point-and-shoot stills camera, the BMPCC is capable of shooting video using Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) and now, the compressed RAW format as well, all to a fast SD card. It’s a versatile camera that we’re sure will be in the hands of lots of filmmakers.

This week we cover

  • Getting to know the camera. We’ll explore the details of the Pocket Cinema Camera, including its ergonomics, which lenses to use, crop factor, power, and firmware.
  • What to look out for. No camera is perfect, and we’ll show you some of the limitations of the Pocket Cinema Camera.
  • Workflow. The Pocket Cinema Camera can shoot Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) in a couple different modes and soon it’ll be able to shoot RAW video. We’ll take a look at how to best handle files coming off the camera.
  • Real-world examples. We’ll evaluate several shots from a studio shoot, breaking down what we liked and what we didn’t.



What is the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 1, 2013 at 3:07:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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How To Read A Waveform Monitor & Vectorscope

Episode60_01-500x299

When reading video scopes for the first time, it can be tough to figure out what you’re actually looking at. But tools like waveform monitors and vectorscopes can help with the exposure and color in your shots—and are definitely worth the time spent learning how to use them.
The primary thing to keep in mind is that these tools are more accurate than your eyes in providing an objective, analytical snapshot of your video signal. This week we’ll explore

  • Why scopes are essential in helping you achieve better shots
  • How a histogram complements the information on a waveform monitor
  • How to use a waveform monitor to judge exposure and contrast
  • How to use a vectorscope to analyze hues and saturation in a shot

Learning how to use both a waveform monitor and vectorscope can really aid you in getting beautiful shots that are properly exposed, and with vibrant, consistent color. Be sure to check out both the sample video below, and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com to learn how you can use them with your own projects.




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Twitter or Facebook




How To Read A Waveform Monitor & Vectorscope Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 16, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography



I love timelapse photography. And here's my new class all about the topic!
Get the class here – http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tutorials/Creating-Time-Lapse-Video/1379...




Postprocessing choices for time-lapse photography Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 7, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Recording Audio for an Interview: DSLR Video Tips

Episode57_2-500x281
Having clear, crisp audio tracks is essential for effective corporate videos, commercials, documentaries—and particularly critical for interview footage. Audiences are often willing to forgive small technical mistakes with video, but far less so with problematic audio.

This week we’ll set up to shoot an interview, and look at ways to improve audio recording quality on location. It’s easy to focus solely on capturing great visuals while shooting an interview; but audio that’s hard to hear, distorted, or runs together between interviewer and subject can quickly ruin a production–and possibly even require a reshoot. To help you capture the best audio with interview footage, this week we’ll discuss:
  • Why good audio is essential to an interview
  • How to place microphones for the best results
  • Best practices for positioning the interviewee, interviewer, and crew
  • Interview techniques including making your subject comfortable, having questions prepared, and not talking over your subject’s answers
Often you’ll only have one chance to get interview audio right, so check out this week’s episode so you’ll be prepared before your next shoot. Remember, each week’s episode is free for seven days–tell your video and photography friends to watch for free.



Recording Audio for an Interview: DSLR Video Tips Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 24, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Choosing a DSLR frame rate


This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré. This tutorial discusses which frame rate you should choose, depending on your specific requirements. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials...



Choosing a DSLR frame rate Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 20, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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DSLR tutorial: Transferring from a card into Premiere Pro



In this tutorial, Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman explain how to bring footage into Premiere Pro from a card. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials....

This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré.




Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 13, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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DSLR tutorial: Frame size recommendations



This tutorial answers the universal question, "Which frame size should I use?" by covering the basics of frame size.



DSLR tutorial: Frame size recommendations Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Apr 3, 2013 at 6:23:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Choosing the Right Frame Rate and Frame Size



Adorama Photography TV Presents DSLR | Video Skills with Rich Harrington. This episode will reveal how to choose the proper frame rate and frame size when shooting with a DSLR video camera.

Follow Rich as he explains the difference between frame sizes and frame rates and which is appropriate for different shooting scenarios. Then, watch as he takes you into a DSLR camera menu and shows you how to choose your frame size and rate.

Check out more DSLR videos here –








Choosing the Right Frame Rate and Frame Size Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 29, 2012 at 7:51:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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DSLR tutorial: Setting levels



This digital video tutorial explains how to get your audio recorders set up to record at the right levles. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/10370....

This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré.



DSLR tutorial: Setting levels Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 28, 2012 at 7:50:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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DSLR Tutorial: Why use a dedicated audio recorder?



This digital video tutorial explains how to get better quality audio with a dedicated audio recorder. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/video-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips/103707-2.html



DSLR Tutorial: Why use a dedicated audio recorder? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 18, 2012 at 6:46:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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Talking About Lens Flare



This digital video tutorial explains the difference between intentional and accidental lens flare and their causes. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/10370....



Talking About Lens Flare Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 14, 2012 at 11:10:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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How to Get Great Video Interviews



Adorama Photography TV Presents DSLR | Video Skills with Rich Harrington. Join Rich as he reveals great tips and techniques on how to achieve a good interview. From establishing a proper relationship with your subject, to eye-line, feedback, and how to ask follow-up questions, Rich will sit down with filmmaker Irene Magafan to talk about her newest documentary.

AdoramaTV features talented hosts including: Mark Wallace, Gavin Hoey, Joe McNally, Joe DiMaggio, Tamara Lackey, Bryan Peterson, and Rich Harrington.



How to Get Great Video Interviews Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 13, 2012 at 6:46:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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What is a DSLR Loupe?



This digital video tutorial explains how to use an external video loupe to magnify the actual image that you're seeing on the camera LCD and to block ambient light. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/103707-....



What is a DSLR Loupe? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 8, 2012 at 8:08:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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What is an Electronic Viewfinder?



This digital video tutorial explains what an EVF, or electronic view finder, is, and why they provide a higher resolution view of your scene. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/10370....



What is an Electronic Viewfinder? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 20, 2012 at 10:59:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Three Point Lighting Explained




AdoramaTV Presents DSLR Video Tips with Richard Harrington. Join Rich as he discusses three-point lighting when shooting an interview on DSLR.

Three-point Lighting is a combination of a Key light, back light, and a fill light. Three-point light gives you full control over the light and shadows casting over your subject. Understanding the three-point lighting technique gives you the building blocks to advance with your photography.



Three Point Lighting Explained Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jul 15, 2012 at 8:13:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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Recording Sync Sound: DSLR | Video Skills



Adorama Photography TV Presents DSLR | Video Skills with Rich Harrington. Join Rich as he demonstrates how to record sync sound audio when shooting with a DSLR camera. This video focusses on how to record great audio for your next project... we'll cover postproduction in a future episode.

Most DSLR cameras have a built in microphone, but to accomplish good professional audio you need more. Audio is one of the most important elements when producing video. Having an dedicated microphone to capture your audio can increase the overall quality of your video. In this episode, Rich demonstrates how to capture audio with various devices that are compatible with DSLR cameras.

Related Products:

Please be sure to post a comment on the video… on the YouTube page please!






. Comments always welcome… but can we balance out the folks who say I look like Lord Voldermort or sound like Vince Vaughn with some useful ones?



Recording Sync Sound: DSLR | Video Skills Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jul 4, 2012 at 5:39:00 amComments (2) DSLR VideoVideo
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Vincent Laforet & the Canon C300

NAB 2012 - Vincent Laforet & the Canon C300 from RHED Pixel on Vimeo.

My producer, Pamela Berry, catches up with Vincent Laforet at NAB. Learn about the Canon C300 and his new film Mobius at NAB 2012. (Behind the Scenes)



Vincent Laforet & the Canon C300 Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Apr 19, 2012 at 8:35:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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DSLR Rolling Shutter Explained

DP BestFlow - Rolling Shutter Explained from ASMP dpBestflow on Vimeo.



I explain the problems of a rolling shutter when shooting video with a DSLR, and how to make sure that fast moving subjects aren't distorted or stuttery.

From the
dpBestflow.org project.



DSLR Rolling Shutter Explained Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Mar 27, 2012 at 7:31:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Connecting a Video Monitor to a DSLR Camera

DP BestFlow - Connecting a Video Monitor from ASMP dpBestflow on Vimeo.



I explain the different accessories and monitors you can connect to your DSLR camera in order to see your video footage better.

From the
dpBestflow.org project.




Connecting a Video Monitor to a DSLR Camera Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Mar 23, 2012 at 7:28:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Recording Sync Sound for a DSLR

DP BestFlow - Recording Sync Sound from ASMP dpBestflow on Vimeo.



Capturing quality audio with a DSLR camera can be a bit of a challenge. I explain how to get good audio on your next DSLR video shoot.

From the
dpBestflow.org project.




Recording Sync Sound for a DSLR Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Mar 20, 2012 at 5:30:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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Shooting Video? Better Under than Overexposed

This is a sneak peek from a new book I am writing – Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots

While you can do a lot in postproduction to fix exposure, video files are a lot like working with JPEG images (as opposed to raw photos). Push an adjustment too far and you’ll get posterized image where details are clipped. Shoot too dark or too bright and you’ll have no information to work with and possibly quite a bit of noise.

The key is to always protect your highlights. Do not let the bright areas of your image (like skies or faces) get clipped. One view you likely have on your camera is a histogram. You typically can see this after taking a photo or cycling through your view options (in most cameras you can push the Info button or press your navigation dial from side to side to cycle views). If the histogram is pushed against the right edge, it means you have no information to work with. Blown out highlights go pure white and there is just no way to recover the details.

Here you can see the same scene shot two different ways. In the first, I shot things a little hot. With color correction in post, I was able to recover a lot of details. But you’ll notice that a lot of the details in the shadows are clipped.

Ch06_Over
Be careful to keep your histograms from getting slammed to the right.
ISO 125 | 1/50th sec. | f/14 | 32mm lens

On the other hand, I also shot the scene and exposed for the “boring middle.” In this case the histograms were more balanced and I had a lot more information to work with. After color correction (a Levels and Saturation adjustment), the shot looks a lot better.

Ch06_Under

It’s better to slightly underexpose than overexpose when shooting video. Notice how the shadowy details in the rocks are preserved better in this version.
ISO 100 | 1/60th sec. | f/14 | 32mm lens


The use of a loupe or viewfinder is essential for outdoor shooting. Bright light on your LCD just makes things damn near impossible to judge. If this is out of your price range, wear a hat and use it as a shield for time to time to judge exposure. I can’t emphasize enough though that a loupe should be one of your first investments if you become serious about shooting video on your DSLR camera. By removing all light pollution, you can make accurate decisions.

Ch06_loupe
Photo by
Vanelli


Be sure to pre-order my new book – Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots




Shooting Video? Better Under than Overexposed
Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 28, 2011 at 7:15:00 am DSLR VideoVideo
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Time Lapse Part 3: Assembling a Timelapse Shot

Time Lapse Part 3: Assembling a Timelapse Shot



From the Creative COW DSLR Essentials Podcast, Robbie Carman and Richard Harrington bring you part three in a three-part series on creating time lapse. This episode covers assembling a time lapse shot.

Check out more at –
http://library.creativecow.net/harrington_richard/




Time Lapse Part 3: Assembling a Timelapse Shot Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 3, 2011 at 8:30:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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The Great Camera Shootout 2011: Episode 2 ~ "Sensors & Sensitivity"

The Great Camera Shootout 2011: Episode 2 ~ "Sensors & Sensitivity" from steve weiss on Vimeo.



I got to see some of this great footage and test at a sneak peek at NAB. This is a real-world comparison of DSLR and other CMOS type sensor cameras like the RED, Alexa, and Sony F3.

Episode 2, “Sensors & Sensitivity” of the three part series continues with tests covering sensitivity, resolution, compression and the relationship between them. These tests were designed and administered by Robert Primes ASC, director of the Single Chip Camera Evaluation (SCCE) and shown at 2K screenings around the world to indie filmmakers, event shooters, commercial DP’s, directors and corporate filmmakers alike. Their opinions on the footage are invaluable when it comes to understanding what all this data means in real world shooting situations.





Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 7, 2011 at 12:34:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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+1

Zacuto Electronic Viewfinder Adds New Features

EVFflip
My Zacuto Electrnic Viewfinder showed up Saturday. I'm already using it on my second shoot tonight. This thing is so awesome in that I can really see things like exposure and focus with a true viewfinder. The buttons are easy to use, the unit feels solid (but weighs practically nothing).

The best part? The fact that I've only had it a few days and Zacutto is already adding features via a free firmware update (love that).

Here's the complete user manual so you can check out the features.
Download the current EVF Manual: Z-Finder EVF Manual

Heres the free firmware update (took 20 seconds to update)
Current Version of Firmware: 1.01.00.  Click Here To Download
Firmware 1.01.00 includes the following updates:
  • Audio meters enabled that are able to be positioned in any of the four corners.
  • Battery meter can now be positioned in any of the four corners
  • Audio loop through enabled
  • Underscan now implemented
  • Can now save and recall Chroma, Contrast and brightness settings as presets.
  • Changes to color, brightness and contrast are now saved on power down and return on power up.
  • Red One, Sony FS100 scaling presets added

How To Upgrade Your Firmware
Once you download the firmware the next thing you need to do is have a USB Thumb Drive formatted to FAT32.  Please note this is not the default file system used for either Mac or PC and by formatting your thumb drive in this way it will erase all data that is currently on the thumb drive.
1. Reformat a USB thumb drive as FAT (FAT 32 or MD-DOS). This can be done with Disk Utility on a Mac or by right-clicking in windows and choosing Format.
2. Download the current firmware –
Click Here To Download
3. Copy the current firmware file to the FAT32 thumb drive (
NOTE: File name must be evfupdate.fw)
4. Insert thumb drive into EVF USB port
5. Select UPDATE from the EVF menu
Menu-12
6. Select 
USB DRIVE
Menu-13
7. Select 
START UPDATE
Menu-14
8. When prompted, power down and restart the unit.
9. Enjoy!

Here is a detailed page about the EVF Units – http://www.zacuto.com/electronicviewfinder-faq







Zacuto Electronic Viewfinder Adds New Features Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 2, 2011 at 6:39:59 amComments (1) DSLR VideoVideo
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How to Calibrate Your HDSLR with Color Bars

A quick post on how to calibrate a HDSLR camera with color bars.

Proper tutorial later. We we're so excited about what we figured out that we just flipped on the laptop iSight camera.



Here are the bars for download – 
www.richardharringtonblog.com/downloads/Color_Bars_Start.png




How to Calibrate Your HDSLR with Color Bars Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Mar 25, 2011 at 2:04:02 pmComments (2) DSLR VideoVideo
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Mastering DSLR Frame Rates

page0_blog_entry1246-title_banner

In this DSLR podcast Robbie Carman and Richard Harrington discuss the various frame rates available on today's DSLR Cameras such as the Canon 7D. Learn what rates to use for proper film looks, slow motion and other special effects, PAL or NTSC.

http://podcasts.creativecow.net/dslr-video-podcast/dslr-frame-rates


Subscribe for free at the COW – http://podcasts.creativecow.net/dslr-video-podcast
Subscribe for free on iTunes – http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/creative-cow-dslr-video-podcast/id409873...





Mastering DSLR Frame Rates Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Mar 14, 2011 at 5:31:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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How to Calibrate DSLR Video Cameras

calibratecams
Oftentimes you'll find yourself using more than one camera body while shooting footage. This may be to get an extra angle or to avoid having to change lenses in the field. The closer your camera settings the match, the more seamless it will appear when you edit the different footage together. Ideally the acquired footage will match as closely as possible. This means that you to adjust both the aesthetic and technical properties.

Aesthetic Matching

Look inside the camera and check your menu settings. You'll typically find several options that will aesthetic properties of the footage. Ideally, you'll closely match these settings across multiple cameras:
  • Color settings – Use the same color space for each camera if it's a choice.
  • Picture Style – Many cameras offer different modes that stylize the footage. We recommend shooting flat and adjusting your color with Adobe Premiere Pro or After Effects after the shoot for greater flexibility.
  • Shutter speed – Your shutter speed should typically be 1/60 if shooting 30 fps or 1/50 if shooting 24 fps. You can alter this number for different looks, but be sure the cameras all match.

Technical Matching

You’ll also want to check several technical properties for each camera. Be sure to identically match the following properties across each camera:
  • Frame size – Your frame sizes must match. Be sure that you aren’t mixing 720p with 1080p.
  • Frame rate – All your cameras must match frame rate (exactly). Be sure to check that you have a precise match. Make sure the firmware of your cameras is also up to date.
  • Color calibration – Be sure that all angles color calibrate at the same time, on the same subject, under identical lighting conditions. Otherwise, you’ll have a lot more postproduction work.

For more on the fusion of photography and video, check out From Still to Motion.




How to Calibrate DSLR Video Cameras Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 21, 2011 at 2:55:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo
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How to Create a Master File for Video

laptop
For many, getting footage into their edit application is the easy part. It's getting the footage out that becomes tricky. While each editing application will all have its own unique steps for exporting a project, the process is pretty standard. Use these steps to create a master file.

  1. Identify the final sequence. This sequence should be what is called "picture-locked" meaning that no additional changes will take place to the sequence.
  2. Make sure that the whole sequence is rendered. Click in the timeline and choose Select All, then render the clips.
  3. Mark and In point at the start of the footage you want, then mark an Out point at the end of the range. For most editing tools, you can use the keyboard shortcuts I and O for In and Out respectively.
  4. Look in the file menu or application menu for an option to export the file. Choose this option.
  5. Export the file using the same high quality settings that you were editing with, meaning the same frame size, frame rate and codec.
  6. Save the file to a location of your choosing, keep in mind that the file you export will be large so choose a location that has enough storage space.

After exporting the file you now have your master file that you can make compressions from, pull stills from or archive.





How to Create a Master File for Video
Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 9, 2010 at 7:02:00 pmComments (1) DSLR VideoVideo
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