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COW Blogs : Richard Harrington's Blog : DSLR Video
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More Preparation for Multi-camera Shooting

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There’s a lot involved when setting up a shoot with multiple DSLR’s- preparation and planning are key. Finding the location that works for you is important, and lighting it for multiple cameras is a challenge.

On this week’s show, Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington walk you through the key elements for a multiple DSLR camera shoot. They’re joined by Director of Photography Jim Ball for additional tips. You’ll learn the following:

  • Preparing for a Multiple DSLR Camera Shoot. Learn what to think about before you shoot. Multi-camera is all about planning and preproduction.
  • Scout the Location. Walk through a venue and learn to spot potential problems–and opportunities with your shooting location.
  • Lighting for Multiple Cameras. Figure out how to work with available light and position new lights inconspicuously to enhance the scene.
  • A DP’s Perspective on Multi-camera Lighting. Learn how a director of photography approaches a multi-camera production.
  • Matching Cameras. You need to preserve seamless cuts between angles. Learn what needs to be done before you shoot.

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best performance, and make editing a breeze.




More Preparation for Multi-camera Shooting Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 14, 2013 at 8:37:00 pm DSLR Video
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DSLR tutorial: The Exposure Triangle

When shooting video, exposure requires an almost scientific understanding of light. In this tutorial, explore a straightforward way to get strong, well-exposed shots with your DSLR. Watch more athttp://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials...




DSLR tutorial: The Exposure Triangle Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 20, 2013 at 1:33:00 pm DSLR Video
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How Sensitive is Your Camera?

When you’re talking about exposure, it’s important to know the sensitivity of your camera. A camera’s sensitivity is measured with an ISO unit. The ISO standard is controlled by a technical group called the International Organization for Standardization and it’s the digital equivalent to film speed from days past.

From camera to camera, the native sensitivity will vary. Newer cameras tend to be more sensitive to light thanks to improvements in camera sensors. This means that you can shoot with less available light or use smaller apertures to control depth of field. But if you set your ISO too high, your shot will look grainy or noisy. Learning how to control ISO is the final step in perfecting the exposure triangle.

This week we cover:

  • What is ISO? Learn what ISO is and new ways to think about the concept.
  • A DP’s perspective on ISO: Catch up with director of photography Jim Ball and learn how he works with ISO settings to get the shot.
  • Adjusting ISO: Learn how to choose the right ISO setting for your camera.
  • Evaluating the shots: We’ll evaluate several shots from our music video withJason Masi, breaking down what worked and what didn’t.

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best exposure and set your camera so the shot is clean and sharp.




How Sensitive is Your Camera? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Oct 18, 2013 at 2:44:00 pm DSLR Video
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Mastering Shutter Speed

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Does your footage look too choppy? Are action scenes a streaky mess? It might be because your shutter speed isn’t set properly. The shutter in a camera is a lot like a pair of shutters on a window. It controls how much light comes through and hits the camera’s sensor.

This week, we continue to look at exposure. There are three critical pieces to achieving good exposure and creative control with your shots. Fortunately, shutter speed is the easiest to learn, with just a few simple rules.

This week we’ll cover

• What is shutter speed?
Learn how shutter speed settings affect the look of your footage.

• A DP’s perspective on shutter speed. 
Catch up with director of photography Jim Ball and learn how chooses shutter speed settings.

• Adjusting the shutter speed.
Learn how to make adjustments to the settings on your camera to get the best shots.

• Real-world examples. 
We’ll evaluate several shots from our recent music video with Jason Masi, breaking down what worked and what didn’t.

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best exposure, and control the shutter speedand exposure of your shots. Be sure to check back next week for more DSLR Video Tips!




Mastering Shutter Speed Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Oct 11, 2013 at 1:15:00 pm DSLR Video
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DSLR Video Planning and Shooting


Here's a recent presentation from Photoshop World — DSLR Video Planning and Shooting. Learn about the process of planning for and creating a DSLR video project.



DSLR Video Planning and Shooting Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 28, 2013 at 9:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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Mastering exposure: DSLR Video Tips

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When it comes to capturing great images, exposure is critical. Under- or overexpose your shot and you lose precious details. But setting the proper exposure isn’t easy; your light may move behind a cloud, or change over time. When shooting video, exposure requires an almost scientific understanding of light.

In this week’s
DSLR Video Tips, we’ll show you a straightforward way to get strong, well-exposed shots. You’ll learn about

  • Exposing for video — What is the desired goal when exposing for video and when does it look “right”?
  • Balancing the exposure triangle – Learn how to balance the shutter speed, ISO, and aperture of the camera. It’s critical to get the right mix for both technical and artistic reasons.
  • Evaluating the settings – We’ll look through several shots, and break down what worked—and what didn’t
Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com and learn to take better shots right away!




Mastering exposure: DSLR Video Tips Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 27, 2013 at 9:42:00 am DSLR Video
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Use a Field Monitor for Better Shots

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A common phrase among DSLR pros is that “everything looks good on the back of the camera LCD.” While intended as a joke, the phrase really means that it’s hard to judge aspects of your shot like critical focus, color, and exposure using the LCD on the back of a DSLR camera. As these LCDs are generally very small, it can also be difficult for on-set clients and team members (like a focus puller) to clearly see what the camera is actually shooting.

That’s where field monitors come in. Over the past few years, lightweight field monitors offering flexible connectivity, high-resolution large screens, and extensive features have become more affordable. This week, we’ll explore the benefits of using a field monitor, including

· What a field monitor is, and how it helps you in the field
· How to connect a field monitor to your camera
· Using peaking or focus in red to assist in getting sharp focus
· Using zebra patterns and color assist options to get proper exposure
· Passing the video signal thru a field monitor to other devices, like an electric viewfinder (EVF) or larger client monitor.



Field monitors can immediately improve the quality of your shots, so be sure to check out the episode to learn how you can use them in your own shooting workflow. And remember, each week’s DSLR Video Tips episode is free for seven days, so be sure to tell all your video and photography friends to watch it this week.
Often you’ll only have one chance to get interview audio right, so check out this week’s episode so you’ll be prepared before your next shoot. Remember, each week’s episode is free for seven days–tell your video and photography friends to watch for free.
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Use a Field Monitor for Better Shots Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 14, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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DSLR tutorial: You call this a mic?



This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré. This digital video tutorial looks at one of the reasons the audio recorded with your DSLR sounds so bad: it might be your mic. Watch more at
http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials....



DSLR tutorial: You call this a mic? Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Sep 8, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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Correcting backlit subjects: DSLR Video Tips

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Out in the field, you’ll often find yourself in a situation where the nicest-looking shot is extremely backlit. For example, an office interview scene with bright windows behind the subject can create a challenging shooting situation. The problem with strongly backlit shots is that they make it difficult for your audience to focus on what you want them to: your subject! Worse yet, you might not even realize how backlit your shot is until you begin the postproduction process.
This week, we’ll take a look at
fixing a backlit shot from a recent music video shoot. Although it can seem that backlit footage is impossible to fix, we’ll show you some powerful tools and techniques to add to your toolkit that can help, including:
• Understanding what backlighting is
• Using scopes to verify your exposure, and detect a backlit shot
• Using Masks in Adobe SpeedGrade CC to compensate for backlighting
• Working with Tiffen’s Dfx plugins to relight and add texture to backgrounds
Be sure to
check out this week’s episode so you’ll be prepared to fix any backlit shots that come up in your productions. And remember, each week’s episode is free for seven days, so invite your video and photography friends to check it out.



Correcting backlit subjects: DSLR Video Tips Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 19, 2013 at 6:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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Connecting a Video Monitor



I explain the different accessories and monitors you can connect to your DSLR camera in order to see your video footage better. From the extensive DPBestflow site I highly recommend.



Connecting a Video Monitor Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jun 22, 2013 at 3:46:00 pm DSLR Video
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Rolling Shutter Explained



I explain the problems of a rolling shutter when shooting video with a DSLR, and how to make sure that fast moving subjects aren't distorted or jittery. From the extensive DPBestflow site I highly recommend.



Rolling Shutter Explained Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jun 8, 2013 at 3:46:00 pm DSLR Video
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DSLR tutorial: Apps you can use to record sync sound



Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/10370.... This digital video tutorial explains how to use an iOS or Android device as a dedicated digital audio recorder with the help of a few different apps.

This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré.




Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 18, 2013 at 11:12:00 pm DSLR Video
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Sync Sound Post-Production



Adorama Photography TV Presents DSLR | Video Skills with Rich Harrington. In earlier episodes Rich showed you some great gear to use and the best field work flow when shooting sync sound. Join Rich again in this episode as he shares the post-production process for the final edit in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Watch as he takes you through the steps to use Premiere's built-in method of syncing sound. Then, follow along as he explains a way to use popular programs, such as Plural Eyes, for those high volume projects.


Check out more DSLR videos here –







Sync Sound Post-Production Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 10, 2013 at 10:01:00 pmComments (1) DSLR Video
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DSLR tutorial: Why does my exposure change with a zoom lens?



This digital video tutorial explains why your exposure changes when you zoom: cheaper lenses have variable f-stops. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/DSLR-Video-Tips-Rich-Harrington/10370....

This specific tutorial is from the DSLR Video Tips series presented by lynda.com authors Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman. The complete DSLR Video Tips course is presented as a weekly lynda.com series and covers the most common questions videographers encounter when shooting and editing with DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras, from choosing a frame size and frame rate to understanding moiré.




Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 6, 2013 at 10:01:00 pm DSLR Video
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Zoom, Zoom, and Check Focus on a DSLR

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If want to check focus, you need to take a few extra steps. Just turning on the LCD and glancing at it won’t cut it. The small screen makes everything look more in focus because it can’t show you all the pixels at once. The reduced image size creates the illusion of a sharper image.
If you want to really see what is in focus, you’ll need to zoom, and then zoom some more. If you’re using a zoom lens, zoom in as tight as possible on your subject. Zooming in on an area like the eyes works well; a button on a shirt works well too. You’ll then need to digitally zoom.
Typically, you’ll find a Zoom button (look for a magnifying glass with a plus symbol in it) on your camera. Pressing it will enlarge the image on your screen and only show you part of the image. You may need to use the command dial to navigate around the zoomed in pixels. Find the detail area that you want to focus on.

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Zooming in on your LCD can help you check focus before you roll a video shot.

You can then use the focus ring on your camera to tweak the focus. Make minor turns to find the ideal focus. If needed, adjust the aperture and ISO settings of your camera to refine the depth of field. When you’re satisfied, you can either press the Zoom Out button or just press the Record button to roll the camera.
Be sure to check out the book — Creating DSLR Video: From Snapshots to Great Shots




Zoom, Zoom, and Check Focus on a DSLR Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 30, 2012 at 7:56:00 pm DSLR Video
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Using a DSLR Slate App

DSLR: Using a Slate App



DSLR video training with Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington: This episode talks about why you want an iPad for production. There is a DSLR Slate App (often used for production information, a sync point for dual system audio, etc.) which now moves all of this information to your portable device.

Check out more at –
http://library.creativecow.net/harrington_richard/



Using a DSLR Slate App Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 14, 2011 at 8:03:00 pm DSLR Video
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Monitoring Solutions with HDMI for DSLR Video

DSLR: Monitoring Solutions with HDMI



DSLR video training with Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington: This episode visits HDMI and monitoring in general.

Check out more at –
http://library.creativecow.net/harrington_richard/




Monitoring Solutions with HDMI for DSLR Video Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 5, 2011 at 7:27:00 pm DSLR Video
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DSLR Video Essential Gadgets

DSLR: Essential Gadgets




DSLR video training with Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington: This episode examines the essentials for DSLR video, including the BlackRapid R-Strap, a calibration target from PhotoVision, LED on-camera lights, hot shoe splitters or adapters, a mountable mini bi-directional level, hard cases for small items, and more.




DSLR Video Essential Gadgets Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Oct 26, 2011 at 8:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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New Canon 1D Adds Major Video Features

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The Official Canon Press Release — Video Section (Annotated by Rich Harrington)


Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work.
Nice to see when they admit a problem. This is a true focus on professional workflows (which is great to see)

The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow.
The first option is HUGE. This will mean bigger files, but fewer compression artifacts. It will also mean that the files will be easier to edit as they place less demand on the computer's CPU and GPU.

Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production.
TImecode is the law that lets multiple pieces of gear to play together. This is absolutely essential to professional workflows.

Canon's all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moiré than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality.
Full sensors are great for low light… not so much for outdoor shooting. Remember to keep a matte box around for filtration.

A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB. The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor.
This is great and removes the artificial barrier. Pro cameras have been splitting and reconnecting files for years.
Although the phrase "the same convenient DSLR form factor" is clearly a misperception. Come on Camera, make a digital back feature that makes it easier to modify the camera and add some XLR ports.

The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.
This is great… but I'd really like to see some more 720 options.
From what I hear, the Canon announcement in early November is DIFFERENT, than this announcement and should be interesting.


The Canon EOS-1D X also includes manual audio level control, adjustable both before and during movie recording, an automatic setting, or it can be turned off entirely.
Manual controls… what a concept (sarcasm). But hey.. it's about time and its grab to have them. Especially during the record event.

A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input.
I still suspect the internal mic is crap.
Stereo mic input… crap… make an XLR adapter.
What about output? Hopefully the A/V port will work. Would make the on-the-fly adjustments more useful.

(See the full release here –
http://usa.canon.com/cusa/about_canon?pageKeyCode=pressreldetail&docId=0901...)
The camera is supposed to ship in March 2012

From what I hear, the Canon announcement in early November is DIFFERENT, than this announcement and should be interesting.



New Canon 1D Adds Major Video Features Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Oct 18, 2011 at 6:15:21 am DSLR Video
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How to Not Screw Up Your DSLR Memory Cards in the Field

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I had a revelation today on how to handle my memory cards while shooting in the field. You see when shooting DSLR video, I can burn through a lot of cards. Plus I typically have a couple of camera angles going off at once. An easy mistake to make (but deadly nonetheless) is reformatting a card that you've already shot to. So here's my surefire plan to keep things straight.

  • Right Pocket – The right pocket contains all of my empty cards that I wiped before the shoot. All cards are erased before you get on-set so you know if you put the card in and it has something on it, then that's footage that needs to be backed up.
  • Left Pocket – The left pocket contains all of the cards that have been filled up while shooting.

You're probably saying.... "Ummm... what's the big deal?" Well here's the killer memory jingle to not screw things up.

"The Cards in my
RIGHT pocket are the RIGHT ones to use.... The Cards in my LEFT pocket should be LEFT alone."

Okay... I won't win a Pulitzer for that... but hopefully it'll keep me from accidentally screwing things up when shooting.


For more on the fusion of photography and video, check out From Still to Motion.






Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 23, 2011 at 6:10:51 am DSLR Video
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DSLR Video: You're Not Shooting Raw, So Watch those Highlights

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Most professional photographers have grown accustomed to the flexibility that shooting with a raw format provides. When coupled with the great control of the Adobe Camera Raw plug-in, they have great control over highlights and shadows as well as the ability to recover exposure problems.

Unfortunately, your DSLR won’t shoot raw when it’s set to video mode. This means its like the old days (note we didn't say good old days) when you had to shoot JPEG. You’ll need to dig back into your past experience (be it film or JPEG) and retrieve the knowledge needed to help you make important decisions during acquisition.

When shooting outdoors, the use of a LCD viewfinder is highly recommended. These devices make it much easier to see a display as well as judge the quality of exposure. By removing all light pollution, you can make accurate decisions.

Just because you’re working with a movie file doesn’t mean all future options are limited. During postproduction, you can further enhance your footage. The first pass is color correction, which addresses issues with color and tone. Optionally, a color-grading pass can also be done to further improve the images with stylized adjustments that affect the mood and tone of the footage and thus develop the story.

For more on the fusion of photography and video, check out From Still to Motion.





Posted by: Richard Harrington on Jan 11, 2011 at 7:03:00 am DSLR Video
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DSLR Frame Rates – New Episode

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In this
DSLR podcast Robbie Carman and Richard Harrington discuss the various frame rates available on today's DSLR Cameras such as the Canon 7D. Learn what rates to use for proper film looks, slow motion and other special effects, PAL or NTSC.

http://podcasts.creativecow.net/dslr-video-podcast/dslr-frame-rates


Subscribe for free at the COW – http://podcasts.creativecow.net/dslr-video-podcast
Subscribe for free on iTunes –
http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/creative-cow-dslr-video-podcast/id409873...





DSLR Frame Rates – New Episode Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 22, 2010 at 10:48:00 amComments (2) DSLR Video
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Creating Prints from Video Frames

How do you take a great still photo with your video-enabled DSLR camera? That's easy, shoot in photo mode. You'll get the best quality and even the option of using a raw format. But what happens if you've got the perfect shot, except you're in the middle of recording a video clip? The good news is that you can export stills directly from a piece of video. There's just a few limitations.
resample

Resolution limitations of video

You might be thinking to yourself “Isn't video really low resolution?” Yes, when compared to the native size of photos taken with your DSLR, video pales in comparison. But for many uses, such as web or newspaper, you can get enough pixels out.
Currently the highest resolution you’ll get exporting a still from a piece of video that originated on a DSLR is 1920 x 1080 or approximately 2.1 megapixels. While you aren’t going to make any panoramic prints of those frames you can still find a lot of great uses for them. If printing at 300 ppi, you can extract a frame that is about 6.5 X 3.5 inches.




Creating Prints from Video Frames Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 19, 2010 at 12:29:00 pm DSLR Video
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Setting Up The Camera Correctly for DSLR Video


Learn how to setup your camera correctly for the appropriate white balance, color quality, and recording format. You’ll also discover how to get better focus and create more stable shots when shooting video with your DSLR camera. Find out how to review clips, drop clips into the timeline, and adjust levels, saturation or color in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Check out the whole series.



Setting Up The Camera Correctly for DSLR Video Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Oct 19, 2010 at 6:46:16 am DSLR Video
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DSLR Video Quick Canon Links

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Forgive the short post... off to go teach a new class at Photoshop World.

Here are a few new Canon links to check out

A better way to convert Canon footage? http://16x9cinema.com/blog/2010/8/30/rarevisions-5dtorgb-a-better-way-to-co...
New FCP Plugin for Canon? http://www.canonrumors.com/2010/08/canon-updates-eos-e1-video-plug-in/
New Canon Camera – http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20014685-1.html



DSLR Video Quick Canon Links Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 31, 2010 at 7:42:05 am DSLR Video
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Canon 7D vs. Barbie Video Girl






Canon 7D vs. Barbie Video Girl
Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 16, 2010 at 5:30:00 pmComments (2) DSLR Video
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"The Drive" by Victoria Taylor-Gore



A nice piece by a colleague that merges artistic styles.




"The Drive" by Victoria Taylor-Gore Republished by Richard Harrington

Posted by: Richard Harrington on Aug 9, 2010 at 5:30:00 pm DSLR Video
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